Archive for the ‘shaping knits’ category

Lingerie/Outerwear Merger!

June 8, 2015

I’ve never kept my attraction to lingerie a secret. The soft colors, romantic shapes and lacy details have been a never ending source of fascination for me. Imagine my delight at finding Big Name Designers were of a like-mind for Summer 2015.

That said, you might be surprised to find that I believe a little goes a very long way with lingerie-inspired garments intended as street or office wear. There is a fine line between sexy-edgy-classy and inappropriate-desperate-slutty and this season some designers proved that they weren’t quite sure where that line lay.

Here are just two examples that illustrate the range:

In the first two photos below from designer Betsey Johnson, we see how not to work a lingerie-inspired outfit. (Don’t get me wrong, I love Betsey, it’s just that her taste level can get a bit questionable at times..)

Too much skin, too much sheer, too much cheap all in two little outfits. Nothing implied or left to be flirty. ‘Nuff said.

 

Lingerie Inspired do's and dont's

Lingerie Inspired dont’s and do’s

In the second two photos from designer Tracey Reese, we see lingerie-inspired done right. Note the restrained structure of the eyelet details balancing the soft shapes in the first outfit and the weight of the maxi skirt softened with sculpted lace in the second design.

They are pretty, soft, feminine and will not get you arrested in public or get too much of “that kind” of attention.

So when we want to add lingerie inspiration to our wardrobes we are really looking for a hint of a reference to undies rather than a literal interpretation.

Try these ideas for streetwear to imply lingerie style:

-Think of lace more as trim for a top or the hem of a skirt rather than an entire lace dress.

-Choose a color close to the pinky-peach shade of vintage nighties.

-Try a bias-cut maxi skirt similar to a 30’s nightgown and knit a bed jacket-style topper to wear with it.

-Knit a clingy sweater with style lines that suggest an old fashioned corset to wear over jeans or trousers.

It can be a lot of fun adding these touches to your closet, so enjoy looking cool, pretty, and feminine all summer long!

Looking to Knit some Lingerie Style?

klscollage

 

My book, Knitting Lingerie Style, contains projects for everything you’ll need to dress yourself from the skin outward.

From panties to garter belts/stockings to camisoles/sleepwear and even an underwire bra, we’ve got foundations covered.

Then check out patterns for the outer layer – from a party dress to a jacket and skirt as well as a selection of pretty tops.

There are so many lovely projects in this book (33 to be exact-that’s about $1 each!), it will keep any knitter busy for a good long while.

Buy Knitting Lingerie Style for $32.95 and get:

– a personalized, autographed, hardbound copy

-ANY single pattern of your choice from our website!

This offer is good until June 19th, 2015.

Remember to write which pattern you’d like in the message box upon checkout so we can include it in your order!

 

Get Over It!: Measure for a perfect fit.

August 14, 2014

Anyone who has knitted their own garments has likely come up against the tough decision of what size to choose to make, especially when one owns a fairly bountiful rack (that being a C cup or larger).

Many just choose the full bust measurement and that can come with mixed results, especially if the bust is large and the rest of the body is more petite. This can lead to the bust fitting fine, but the shoulders and everything else swimming on the wearer.

Do you choose the size that matches the measurement of your bust, your bra size or something else?

Well, no, no and yes.

That “something else” is your overbust measurement. This is essentially is the measurement of your chest minus the actual breasts.

overbust

The lower pink line in my illustration is the full bust measurement, taken across the fullest part of the breasts.

The upper pink line is where the overbust measurement is taken.

What you do is take both measurements, then average them. For example, the full bust may be 44” and the overbust might be 40”. The average is 42” and that would be the size to choose.

There still may be additional tweaks (such as adding short rows) to make based on your individual body shape, but this method will bring you much closer to selecting your perfect size.

 

Learn more about those fitting tweaks in my Feminine Fit class on Craftsy.com !

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Knit to Fit Part 5: Unifying Two Sizes

January 10, 2014

Unifying two sizes

For those of us who are not perfectly proportioned, choosing what size to knit can be a conundrum.

Do you go with a size to fit the upper body and hope that it will fit around the tummy/hips, or the size that fits the hips and let your bust/shoulders fend for themselves?

Happily, there is no need to take a chance at all as you can simply choose both sizes and make them meet in the middle.

As an example we’ll use a woman with a smaller upper body and bountiful hips. She wears a medium on top and an XL on the bottom. She finds that for the size garment to fit her hips, she must cast on 100 stitches for the front working from the bottom up.  The size front that will fit her bust asks that she cast on 80 stitches. 

So she casts on her 100 stitches then begins to decrease at the side edges, 1 stitch at each end of her needle every 6th row 10 times, until the 80 stitches she needs remain.  So, what she has done is gently decreased away the material needed to cover her hips until she reaches the number for her upper body, then she continues working as for the smaller size.

   This can work the same way in reverse for those with a larger bust/shoulders and small hips. Simply cast on for the smaller size and increase gently until the number of stitches for the top half of the garment is reached and continue to work as for the larger size.

http://www.whiteliesdesigns.com features many beautiful styles that lend themselves to this technique.

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Classes at Yarnosphere! October 12-13th, 2013

October 2, 2013

 

Join me at Yarnosphere!

Join me at Yarnosphere!

Join me, Joan McGowan Michael, at Yarnoshpere! Yarn show October 12-13, 2013.

I’ll be teaching my very popular Whip Your Knits into Shape workshops and my fun Bead Embroidery for Knits class!

-With Whip Your Knits  Part 1, students will work in teams to take complete measurements of your own bodies and I will show you how to apply that knowledge to getting the best fit possible in your knitted garments. Alterations, the application of short row shaping, ease, and marrying different sizes are all discussed in this class. We keep this class small enough for me to give everyone the personal attention they need, so sign up early to assure a spot.

-In Whip Your Knits Part 2, students will use the measurements taken in Part 1 and transfer them to brown paper to make a basic hard pattern of their body, then using this new pattern to easily design a custom sweater on graph paper. Again, small class size assures personal attention, so reserve early!

Bead Embroidery for Knits is where I get to pull out my small but fantastic collection of 50’s beaded sweaters and we re-create one of the beaded motifs on a swatch which we later turn into a fancy eyeglass case! This technique is great for more than just knits; decorate a tee shirt or jean jacket or even Christmas ornaments

It’s going to be a great knitter’s weekend in Orange County and I can’t wait to see you all there!

Meet the New Girls!

May 24, 2013

They’re girly and pretty and ready for your Summer and Early Fall knitting!KateGillian

Kate and Gillian are my newest styles for WLD!  See both here and start knitting up a storm!

We also now have selected PDF patterns available in our Etsy Shop.

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Knit to Fit- Part 3

May 13, 2013

Fitsketchcolor3jpg

Fit problem number 3.- A Baggy Body

     I see a lot of beautifully curvy women walking around in sweaters or tee shirts cut for men, not realizing that instead of hiding the bits they want to cover up, it makes them look larger all up and down their torso.

Any time  a top hangs off the end of the bust as men’s cuts will do on a woman, it lets the mind’s eye of the onlooker assume that the bagginess of the top is filled in with the wearer’s body whether the case or not.

   Counter this  with a little shaping at the sides of the garment; just enough to suggest the waistline and remove some excess fabric.

My free  Shapely Tank pattern mentioned in a previous post  goes into specifics as to how to achieve this (print one out to keep in your knitting bag) but generally, beginning at the upper hip, you will decrease away about 1” worth of stitches at each seam edge prior to reaching the waist area, and add them back in after the waist.

This 4” of nipping is enough to make a huge difference in how your sweater will flatter your middle. Try it on the next garment you knit.

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Just FYI, many of my patterns are now available as digital downloads in my Etsy shop!

Vogue Knitting Live!

December 13, 2012

I will be heading to NYC to teach at Vogue Knitting live Jan 18th thru 20th, 2013!
My “Whip Your Knits into Shape” class is a must if you’re having trouble with the fit of your sweaters and would like to learn how to shape garments to fit your individual form. There will be two sessions (same class), Friday evening and Sunday afternoon.

See this and the rest of my class descriptions for VKLive here

Booksigningjoan